Wood You? Should You?

Category: My Tools

Homemade Lathe

I found a squirrel cage fan on the side of the road in my neighborhood and harvested the 1/2 horsepower motor to build a lathe. The design is very primitive, it’s basically just a spinning shaft with a piece of plywood on the end. My tool rest is usually just a 2×4 screwed down to the workbench.

photo (29) The motor runs at 1725 rpm so i reduced the speed by half with a belt drive to the main shaft. I attached the faceplate by screwing together two pieces of plywood, one on either side of the pulley.

I used a lag screw to tension the belt to reduce vibration.

I used a lag screw to tension the belt to reduce vibration.

To keep the shaft from slipping back and forth, I cut a groove into the shaft (by turning on the lathe and holding the hacksaw against the shaft) and inserted an aluminum plate.

To keep the shaft from slipping back and forth, I cut a groove into the shaft (by turning on the lathe and holding the hacksaw against the shaft) and inserted an aluminum plate.

The power cord was cut off at about three feet and it was pretty torn up where it entered the motor so it needed to be replaced. There was a threaded hole in the motor casing so I cut a thread on a piece of pvc pipe, and ran the new cord through that, to reinforce the connection to the motor.

My grandfather’s tools

Last summer my grandparents moved out of their house and into an apartment; there was not space for a work shop at the new place so my grandfather gave away most of his tools.

The big thing that I got was his 16″ Delta band saw. I also brought home many cool old hand tools which have proved very useful.

IMG_1822

this tool greatly improved my realm of possibilities

 

I found these Aluminium Craftmans tools, most likely dating back to the 50’s, to be quite cool though they are apparently dangerous to use because the highly conductive Aluminium casing is a shock hazard.

099

sander, circular saw and jigsaw

096

My grandfather etched his initials on all his tools and he added his social security number on these when the Operation Identification program began in the 70’s.

098

part of my grandpa’s ssn etched in the saw.
he also put his initials on all his tools.

Thank you, Opa!