Clock

by woodyoushouldyou

When I got my grandpa’s band saw I promptly set to work cutting out some 300 gear teeth for my clock. Each gear is made of four, five or six pie pieces that are glued together. The escapement gear has insert teeth, I thought it would be likely that one would break and it would be a lot easier to just replace one tooth than remake the entire gear. I used the miter saw to cut all the pieces for the face.

because i was cutting a lot of the same piece, i clamped a block of wood to the saw so i only had to line up the first one.

because i was cutting a lot of the same piece, i clamped a block of wood to the saw so i only had to line up the first one.

To clamp the dodecagon, I screwed twelve 2×4 segments to a sheet of plywood, on the the inside of the dodecagon, and used one clamp on each face putting the whole shape in compression.

clamping the dodecagon

clamping the dodecagon

All the joints in the frame that hold the gears and face to the wall are connected with pocket screws. Three axles are on bearings and two are just lubed steel rods.

the face all glued up.

the face all glued up.

cutting out a escapement gear prototype

cutting out a escapement gear prototype

A viewof the 10 gears. I was orginally going to use a weight as a source of power however, the gears are inefficient so I am using a small motor on the escapement gear axle.

A viewof the 10 gears. I was orginally going to use a weight as a source of power however, the gears are inefficient so I am using a small motor on the escapement gear axle.

You can see the insert teeth on the escapement gear.

You can see the insert teeth on the escapement gear.

i had a hard time hanging it because i couldnt find any studs through the plaster and lathe

I had a hard time hanging it because IĀ couldn’t find any studs in the old plaster walls, so I just used a lot of screws hoping that enough would catch the lathe.

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